List entry




List entry Summary

This monument is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 as amended as it appears to the Secretary of State to be of national importance. This entry is a copy, the original is held by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Name: Allerford New Bridge

List entry Number: 1006197

Location

The monument may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County District District Type Parish
SomersetWest SomersetDistrict AuthorityLuccombe
SomersetWest SomersetDistrict AuthoritySelworthy

National Park: EXMOOR

Grade: Not applicable to this List entry.

This record has been generated from an "old county number" (OCN) scheduling record. As these are some of our oldest designation records they do not have all the information held electronically that our modernised records contain. Therefore, the original date of scheduling is not available electronically. The date of scheduling may be noted in our paper records, please contact us for further information.

Date first scheduled:

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: RSM - OCN

UID: SO 230

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Monument

Single span bridge called New Bridge.

Reasons for Designation

Medieval and early post-medieval single span bridges are structures designed to carry a road or track over a river by means of a single arch, typically 3m- 6m in span. They were constructed throughout the medieval period, most commonly using timber. Stone began to be used instead of timber in the 12th century and became increasingly common in the 14th and 15th centuries. Many medieval bridges were repaired, modified or extensively rebuilt in the post- medieval period. During the medieval period the construction and maintenance of bridges was frequently carried out by large estates and the Church, especially monastic institutions which developed long distance packhorse routes between their landholdings. Some stone built medieval bridges still survive. These can be classified into three main types based on the profile of the arch which is typically pointed, semi-circular or flattened. A common medieval feature is the presence of stone ashlar ribs underneath the arch. The bridge abutments and revetting of the river banks also form part of the bridge. Where medieval bridges have been altered in later centuries, original features are sometimes concealed behind later stonework, including remains of earlier timber bridges. Bridges were common and important features of medieval towns and the countryside and allowed easy access along a well developed road and track-way system. A large number retain significant medieval or post-medieval remains, allowing the original form of the bridge to be determined. Despite widening and restoration the single span bridge called New Bridge retains enough of its original form to be recognisable and remains in use to vehicular traffic.

History

See Details.

Details

This record was the subject of a minor enhancement on 4 August 2015. This record has been generated from an "old county number" (OCN) scheduling record. These are monuments that were not reviewed under the Monuments Protection Programme and are some of our oldest designation records.

This monument includes a single span bridge which crosses the Horner Water carrying the A39 road between Allerford and Porlock. The bridge survives as a single span stone built structure flanked by abutting half arch spans forming flood arches on either end, a pointed central arch, cutwaters, three stone steps from the sub arch to water level on the south west and north east corners and cement saddle back coping to the parapet. Originally of medieval origin, it was re-built before 1628 at which time it was said to be in a state of decay. Repairs were carried out in 1630 and an inquiry into its condition was made in 1647. The bridge was widened in 1866 and bears an inscribed stone in the north parapet reading ‘LP/SP 1866’ recording this fact.

The bridge is Listed Grade II*.

Selected Sources

Other
PastScape Monument No:-35871

National Grid Reference: SS 89989 46655

Map


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This copy shows the entry on 29-Aug-2015 at 10:00:31.